Saturday, March 11, 2006

Heroic

What makes heroic? To go to meet simultaneously one's greatest sorrow and one's greatest hope.
- Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science

6 Comments:

Anonymous Petri said...

Those who ACCEPT their destiny -- that which was given to them -- and then USE it creatively may become Heroes.

What are the cycles of the solar system that you CAN further (even if you didn't like the ones that you resonate with)?

I once wished I was made for leading or furthering a tradition -- that tends to be so clear cut and satisfying -- but I don't think I am (which doesn't mean I wouldn't be capable of doing these things). That's just not THE thing I feel I Must do. I Need to cast a little bit of the Future (that I See) here and there, and that's it. That's the only way I can be a Hero in my own eyes. MY Examiner is Beauty balanced on the scale of the multiverse I experience -- others have other judges.

Whether becoming a Hero is the ultimate ultimate is debatable, at least to me. There are far easier and more fun paths. I tend to try to incorporate as many exciting things into my life the adventure as I can and leave the heroics out of most matters.

5:02 pm  
Blogger Tapio Kotkavuori said...

Dear Petri,

so well said!

You wrote: "Those who ACCEPT their destiny -- that which was given to them -- and then USE it creatively may become Heroes".

I would be curious about what you see to constitute 'destiny': "that which was given" to us.

Genes, personality, archetypes, given multidimensional cultural setting where one did grow up?

What do you think, how often Heroes absolutely resonate with their 'destiny' and how often they just keep on Working for things they really can further in the world?

I tend to think that there often (or categorically all the time?) is something supererogatoric in Hero's actions: He does more than can be demanded of anyone.

7:45 pm  
Blogger Akenanubis said...

I am personally intrigued by the concept of the Heroic, or the Hero. For me, the heroic is that individual who attains, for some others at least, the equation of kleos, agon, arete. That thereby that individual becomes the embodiment of the virtues they cherrish and may become an inspiration for others and thereby be worthy of immortality of name. I often think of these people as my personal household gods. May they live forever in the fruit of their deeds.

Aaron Vlek

3:47 am  
Blogger Ensio Kataja said...

Closely related to the ideas of Destiny and Heroism, Germanic religion places a special emphasis on concerete actions, physical deeds done in a socio-cultural context.

Destiny for the ancient Scandinavians seems to have been an expression of some kind of necessary progression that also bore seeds of transcendence. Therefore, with deliberate actions in the here-and-now, anyone can become a Hero, if that is his or her Will. If the deeds reach an intense, "heroic" level, in the end of this becoming it is possible to say with confidence that this was indeed his or her true destiny.

Here's a question for anyone's personal meditation:

What are your heroic deeds? What deeds have you done so far that could become poems and songs written in your honour? What deeds you would like to do in order to come into being as a Hero and fulfill your Destiny?

12:24 pm  
Anonymous Harry said...

Destiny is an interesting thing, more subjective than objective, but in the end it is the most important thing you can find. Whatever it is, it is the meaning of life.

8:01 pm  
Anonymous Korpinsilmä said...

Ensio wrote:
--->
Destiny for the ancient Scandinavians
seems to have been an expression of
some kind of necessary progression
that also bore seeds of transcendence.
<---

Interesting you should mention
this since I've been pretty much
exploring into this kind of
approach lately. I would relate
this to the quest of finding
one's True Will; the complete
realization of what it is one
really desires to actualize
in his life. One is impelled to
contemplate over the relationship
of "free will" and "true will",
and their real essences
respectively; are they really
different concepts, and if they
are, in what way? To elaborate,
with rhetorical questions:
Is achieving "free will" better
than establishing and following
one's "true will"? Is this kind
of question really meaningful
at all?

In LHP tradition (or "tradition"),
at least superficially,
transcendence is often closely
connected with the concept (or
buzzword, which it more often
is) of free will. On closer
examination I personally view
this mainly a fruitful ground for
many misconceptions to grow in.

- K

9:00 am  

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